Infini-tug Toy

The Infini-tug Toy is PetSafe’s replacement for the Tennis Tug. This is my favorite tug toy. 

  • It is soft on the hands for the humans
  • It is long so allows for a good distance between dog and handler
  • It can fly nicely so you can do a combo fetch/tug game
  • It goes in the wash machine and dryer
    • A little loud in the dryer, but pretty funny if your dryer has a window and the dog can watch it go round and round.

The down sides are short, but should be mentioned:

  • While the fleece is comfortable for the handler, it can be easily destroyed by the dog.
    • Take it out when it’s tug-time. Put it away when tug-time is over.
      • Don’t leave it alone with your dog – IT WILL BE SHREDDED !
  • The fringy end can be pulled by the dog leaving the toy a bit misshapen.
    • It’s a dog toy – who cares how it looks
    • Or, try to keep the dog pulling on the ball end.

Pax’e Learns the Gum Ball Machine

Pax’e learns the gum ball machine is a nice example of trick training using a clicker.

I like using clickers for very specific tricks or tasks.

We’ll see this again when we see more of the nail board

If you have read some of my other blogs, you will know I am not keen on perfect – just getting where we want to go as happily as possible.

You can almost see Pax’e’s brain cells firing away as she tries to understand how to make the gum ball machine work.

Nails part #1

Here is one of my favorite students, Bandit, taking care of his front nails himself on the sanding board. As you can see, he is enjoying himself.

Bandit Stool trick
“Couldn’t I just sit here on this stool looking cute until you forget about that whole nail thing?”

Taking care of our dog’s nails can sometimes be a arduous task but it is a necessary one. If a dog’s nails grow too long, the nails push against the ground every time the dog puts weight on his or her feet which affects the movement of different joints by shifting the alignment of the leg bones and that can cause our dogs pain and lead to arthritis. It is hard to imagine that long nails can cause our dogs hip, knee, spinal pain and more, but it’s like that old song, “…shin bone connected to the knee bone…”

Sometimes our dogs allow nail trimming with little protest, but more often than not, if we have not trained our dogs to tolerate (and even love) nail clipping or dremmeling, they are only putting up with it.

“Love it?” You say?

Indeed. Before my fringy dog Pinball came along, all my dogs had their nails demmeled. dremel%C2%AE8100-9183They came running when they heard me taking out any power tool, disappointment showing on their faces when it wasn’t the Dremmel, but my saw or nail gun instead. And, when it was Dremmel time, it was party time!

Because Pinball has such long fringe, I cannot Dremmel his nails. The fringe from his tail got caught in the sanding drum early on in his nail dremmeling career, and that was enough for all of us. Instead, I have to clip his nails, which is not my favorite. I’ll admit it, I am a “quick wimp” and because of my fear of clipping his quick, I never cut too much away. This leaves his nails always a little too long.

I realized it was time to teach him the sanding board.

Here is one of my favorite students, Bandit, taking care of his front nails himself on the sanding board. As you can see, he is enjoying himself.

“Nails part #2” will instruct you on how to build a sanding board.

“Nails part #3” will outline how to teach your dog to love sanding his or her own nails on your very own sanding board!

Stay tuned!

Top three reasons to love the Whole Dog Journal

The Whole Dog Journal has been a staple of mine for more than fourteen years and I recommend it as required reading for everyone who loves their dogs.

The Whole Dog Journal has been a staple of mine for more than fourteen years.

  • Each year I devour the annual pet dog food (both wet and dry) issues (Reason #1 and pun #1). These analyses allow me to choose the best food based on the specific ingredients and my dog’s needs—not the food that advertises the most.
  • This leads me to reason #2—No Advertising. Because The Whole Dog Journal does not allow advertisements, all their product articles from food to equipment are well researched and without pressure from advertisers!
  • Which leads me to reason #3—their staff of writers are credentialed and passionate about their work. They contribute to the research and they have the backgrounds that offer them the knowledge to comment appropriately on topics of health, training, behavior, and more.

Three Dogs Training encourages you to take a look at The Whole Dog Journal if you have not done so already! Maybe even as a gift to you and your pup(s)!

A Dog Named Boo was reviewed by Interactions magazine!

Interactions magazine, published by Pet Partners, reviewed A Dog Named Boo in the Winter 2013 issue and they loved it!

Pet Partners (formerly known as the Delta Society) reviewed A Dog Named Boo in the latest issue of their periodical magazine, Interactions.

In short, they loved it!

Interactions magazine is print-only so you can check out the review below:

Interactions-A-Dog-Named-Boo