About Lisa

Lisa-and-Boo

Lisa J. Edwards, CPDT-KA, CDBC, is the best-selling author of A Dog Named Boo: The Underdog with a Heart of Gold, and Please Don’t Bite the Baby (and please don’t Chase the dogs) keeping our kids and our dogs safe and happy together.

“The best Dog/Human relationship comes through a balance of boundaries, requested behaviors, and freedoms.”

Lisa’s dog training philosophy

Certifications

Lisa splits her time between classroom instruction and private behavioral consults.

Lisa lives in New York City and sees clients from New York City through the lower Hudson Valley. To see if you are in Lisa’s territory click.

When asked what kind of trainer are you? Lisa replied:

I am a positive reinforcement trainer. To train your dog, we will be using rewards in the form that your dog likes/loves – food, toys, etc. It’s up to them to tell us what works.
My certifications require me to adhere to the principle of – least invasive minimally aversive LIMA – meaning it is my job to figure out what your dog needs for us to modify their behavior in a way that is not scary and not harmful for them (or you, too). Simply put, no pain and no force…

Why is it important to have a trainer who is a CPDT-KA and a behavior specialist who is a CDBC?

Both the CPDT-KA and the CDBC are certifications earned through extensive field experience, testing and/or peer review, and require references from colleagues, clients and other animal professionals.

In order to maintain these credentials, Lisa must complete annual continuing education through workshops, conferences, and lectures. This separates these certifications from many others that require no on-going education. Because of this, Lisa offers you the most up-to-date, evidenced based training knowledge, and both the ASPCA and the AVSAB suggest trainers have certifications like these.

As a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant, Lisa is able to use her knowledge and understanding of the roots of behavioral problems and incorporate that as preventative exercises in her classes in an effort to keep behavioral problems from developing.